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Tips for Trainers: What Type of Squat is Best for Your Client?

March 28, 2016

As a personal trainer, it’s likely that you have suggested squats to your client as part of their workout routine. But, did you know squats are not a one-size-fits-all exercise? You must take into account your client’s age and fitness ability before deciding which type of squat would suit them best. In general, adding resistance to squats will increase the challenge of the exercise for your clients. By adding resistance, you can mix up your client’s fitness routine to avoid their body getting used to the workout and maximize their results. Take a look below at the different forms of squats to ensure you are suggesting the appropriate exercises for each client you serve:

Traditional Squats: Taking it EasyKettle Bell Exercises

Who They’re For:

Traditional squats are the basic squat and good for every client regardless of age or fitness ability. Traditional squats target the backs of the thighs and the glute muscles.

How to Do Them:

To instruct your client on how to perform these squats, simply ask them to stand with their feet together and bend their knees to a 90-degree angle, and hold for ten seconds. Have them return to the upright position, and then repeat.

Sumo Squats: Creating a Challenge

Who They’re For:

Sumo squats, also known as “plié” squats, are good for beginner clients who need more of a challenge. They’re great for targeting the back of the thighs.

How to Do Them:

To perform these squats, have your client stand with their feet apart and pointed out. Then, while maintaining balance, have them squat down and hold for ten seconds before returning to the upright position and repeating. These squats require flexibility regarding the hip muscles, so be sure your client stretches adequately before performing.

Single Leg Squats: Increasing the Intensity

Who They’re For:

Single leg squats are great for providing each leg with a more powerful workout and are great for clients with more advanced fitness abilities. Beginner and intermediate clients can do single leg squats as well, but if they have trouble balancing, have them place a hand on a wall for added stability.

How to Do Them:

To do single leg squats, clients will lift one left up and stick it out straight in front of them. With the other leg, they will slowly lower themselves down until the knee is bent to a 90-degreee angle. Then, have them hold for ten seconds before slowly rising and repeating with other leg.

Pulse Squats: Feeling the Burn

Who They’re For:

Pulse squats are a great way for your clients to get an extra burn out of their squat exercises. Pulse squats can be done performing any type of squat, but you have to watch clients carefully to avoid injury. For example, when combining pulses with single leg squats, your client will only do small dips instead of going all the way down.

How to Do Them:

When your clients are in the squat position, have them slightly pulse up and down for ten seconds to give their thighs and glutes double the workout.

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